Pandan Coconut Ice Cream

 I’ve always liked ice cream but I didn’t fall in love with it until I started making it myself. After my friend moved and left an electric ice cream maker a few years back, we’ve been churning out favourites that give some of those artisan ice cream folks a run for their money.

Usually I’m inspired by juicy, ripe fruit like apricots and berries. Sometimes seasonal flavours like eggnog and chocolate peppermint call to me. Often I’m smitten with exotic spices like saffron and cardamom. And once in a while, a little voice, more specifically, our 11 year old’s voice, pipes in with a flavour suggestion like this pandan coconut ice cream.

I love the toasty aroma of pandan. Toasty is the best word I can find to describe it…although it resembles wide blades of grass, it only yields a mild herbal flavour. Once cut, the toasty pandan aroma fills the kitchen with a heady, nutty note and its warm fragrance wafts through the house as it steeps in the coconut milk. Don’t be alarmed by the amount of pandan. You want it to be fairly strong as its flavour dulls a bit with freezing. If you’re lucky, you can find fresh pandan in Asian markets, otherwise frozen ones work. Please, oh please, don’t bother with that awful artificial green pandan extract. Skip it altogether and make equally delicious coconut ice cream (find that recipe at the end of the post).

Pandan Coconut Ice Cream

2 cups milk
1 1/2 cups coconut milk
1 cup whipping cream
10-12 pandan leaves
1 cup sugar
2 eggs
generous pinch of salt

In a medium saucepan, combine milk, coconut milk and whipping cream.
Chop or snip pandan leaves into bits about 2 cm long and add to saucepan.
Heat until just below boiling, cover pan and remove from heat. Let steep for 1 hour.
Strain the pandan milk mixture and squeeze out as much liquid as you can. You’ll want every pale green drop of essence that you can get.
Return the milk mixture to the saucepan and add sugar and bring to a simmer.
Meanwhile, whisk eggs with salt in a heatproof bowl.
Gradually whisk coconut mixture into eggs then return mixture to saucepan. Stir and heat gently until custard is thickened and coats the back of a spoon.
Strain and cool in ice bath. Refrigerate until cold, at least 4 hours.
Churn in your ice cream maker. Transfer to an airtight container and freeze until firm.

Makes 1 1/2 L ice cream

Coconut Ice Cream

Follow above, omitting pandan and any steps involving it. Just after churning, fold in about 1 cup macapuno (preserved young coconut). Freeze until firm.

Oatmeal Ice Cream

Last year I got whiff of Ice Cream for Breakfast Day. About a month after the fact. I was kicking myself for missing an official opportunity to eat the dreamy, creamy treat to kick start my day (not that I need an official day to do that). So this year I have been vigilant and have noted the date months in advance: Saturday, February 1.

As a dietitian with a bent halo, I am pleased to say that ice cream makes a fine breakfast and hits all the food groups: milk (milk, cream), meat alternatives (eggs), fruits and veggies (fruit) and grains (what grains?). OK, ice cream doesn’t cover the grain group. Not until now.

Oatmeal Ice CreamSo to meet Canada’s Food Guide while honouring Ice Cream for Breakfast Day, here’s a breakfast inspired ice cream. Eat it with fresh or roasted fruit, waffles or pancakes. Imagine it all melty on top of a steaming bowl of apple studded steel-cut oats! Or you can eat it for dinner with a side of fruit. It’s a balanced meal after all.

Oatmeal Ice Cream

1/2 cup old fashioned oats
2 cups whipping cream
1 1/2 cups milk
1/2 cup brown sugar
1/4 cup granulated sugar
1/4 teaspoon ground cinnamon
2 eggs
1/2 teaspoon salt
1 tablespoon whiskey

In a dry skillet, toast oats over medium heat until they are a few shades darker and they start to smell nutty. (I like to toast extra oats to top the ice cream just before serving)
Combine whipping cream, milk, brown and granulated sugars and cinnamon in a medium saucepan. Bring to a simmer. Add toasted oats and simmer for 5 minutes. The oats should be tender but should still hold their shape.
Meanwhile, lightly whisk eggs and salt in a heatproof bowl.
Gradually whisk cream mixture into eggs. Return the mixture to the pan. Stir and heat gently until custard is thickened and coats the back of a spoon.
Chill until very cold, at least 4 hours.
Stir in the whiskey and churn in ice cream maker. Transfer to an airtight container and freeze until firm.

Makes 1 1/2 litres of homey ice cream goodness

Honey-roasted Apricot Ice Cream

There are a few food rules we like to stick to in our household:

  • Choose unprocessed foods.
  • Cook from scratch.
  • Choose the best ingredients possible.
  • Take time to enjoy your food.
  • Food is meant for sharing.

But of course, we all know that rules are broken. We will sometimes buy Timbits on a road trip. When we eat at Chinese restaurants, we don’t make a big deal about how the meat was raised. Sometimes we don’t want to share our food.

I’ve been making homemade ice cream for the past few years and have to say I’ve made some really delectable ones. None of them have wowed me as much as this luscious honey-roasted apricot version. The apricots were roasted to drive off moisture and intensify their flavour while the honey is present but gentle enough to impart a sweet nuance without being overwhelming. Summer perfection.

Sorry. I don’t think we’re going to share this batch. Nope. Gotta be a rebel and break the rules sometimes, you know.

Honey-roasted apricot ice creamHoney-roasted Apricot Ice Cream

Roasted apricots
About 2 lb. ripe apricots
Mild honey

Halve and pit apricots and lay them cut side up on a parchment lined, rimmed baking sheet, drizzle with honey.
Roast at 450 degrees F for 20 to 30 minutes or until apricots start to caramelize.
Cool and reserve 2 cups and chill. Happily eat the rest.

Crème anglaise
1/4 cup honey
1/3 cup sugar
2 cups heavy cream
1 cup milk
1/2 vanilla bean
2 eggs
Pinch salt

Combine honey and sugar in a medium saucepan. Over medium heat, cook until honey starts to bubble and sugar melts. Turn down heat and cook for about 5 minutes.
Add cream, milk and vanilla bean and return to heat. Some of the molten honey will harden but will dissolve while the cream heats.
Turn off heat and let mixture steep for 15 or 20 minutes.
Meanwhile, lightly whisk eggs and salt in a heatproof bowl.
Remove vanilla bean from cream and gradually whisk cream into eggs. Return the mixture to the pan. Stir and heat gently until custard is thickened and coats the back of a spoon.
Strain through a fine meshed sieve and chill until very cold, at least 4 hours.
Combine with reserved apricots and churn in ice cream maker while pacing in anticipation. Transfer to an airtight container and freeze until firm. If you live with other people, stash container at back or bottom of freezer so no one notices it. Savour when no one is looking.

Makes about 1 1/2 ambrosial litres